The physical therapy and rehabilitation fields are confronted with a grim statistic: the #1 risk factor for a future injury is a previous injury. This statistic suggests that by the time a patient walks through the door of a clinic, they are already primed for future injuries, regardless of the care they may receive. The #2 and #3 risk factors are movement asymmetry and motor control, respectively.

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2014 is a year of unprecedented change in the field of chiropractic. Along with the impacts that health reform may have on reimbursement, the field is transitioning to new ways of documenting, reporting, and coding. It can be difficult for doctors to adapt to dramatic administrative changes, while continuing to offer patients the highest quality of care, if they do not have a solid system and reliable team behind them.

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As we start a new year, we often reflect on the progress we've made in the one coming to an end. Some of us may measure progress as trips to the gym, others in dollars earned, while others may keep track in more abstract measurements.

When it comes to the field of physical therapy, results are often measured by a patient's perceived changes. Am I stronger? Has the pain subsided? Can I perform functions I could not previously perform? But a patient's feelings are subjective, and can often be ambiguous, or influenced by emotions or perceptions. Objective findings become a powerful tool for a clinician in determining a patient's treatment plan and progress, while also serving as an easily understood and quantifiable value for the patient and referring parties.

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