For many clinicians the Personal Injury arena is oftentimes a confusing, aggravating and frustrating place. Frequent questions and concerns include: What are the latest Personal Injury clinical documentation requirements? "How do I protect my bill?" "What do the auto carriers want from me?" "How do I navigate around in the current med-legal landscape?" and of course the ever-popular "How do I get more Personal Injury patients?"

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Have you ever been asked to reduce your Personal Injury bill, possibly by a ridiculous percentage? Or have you ever had your PI claims slashed and burned by an "independent" records reviewer? If so, you may have been the "victim" of poor Personal Injury specific documentation.

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Muscle strength is one of the basic building blocks of patient wellness, and, along with mobility, plays a key role in determining a patient's or subject's maximum functional ability. While most practitioners are familiar with the typical "manual resistance" test, some are still not yet aware of the benefits of quantifying and comparing actual force output from a subject's muscles and muscle groups.

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Every job is unique, and so is every worker. The myriad possible variations that exist between worker ability and the demands of the job can often lead to workplace injuries, and can make it difficult to determine whether or not an injured worker can return to work.

In an attempt to close the gap between worker ability and the task at hand, clinicians investigate functional ability by asking questions such as how much can the worker lift? How often? And how high? But unless the clinician knows the details of the job, the patient's objective ability only results in a best-guess as to whether or not the worker can perform the job functions safely and effectively.

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The physical therapy and rehabilitation fields are confronted with a grim statistic: the #1 risk factor for a future injury is a previous injury. This statistic suggests that by the time a patient walks through the door of a clinic, they are already primed for future injuries, regardless of the care they may receive. The #2 and #3 risk factors are movement asymmetry and motor control, respectively.

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